What is the difference between rutabaga and turnip?

The main difference between turnip and turnip is that turnip is a large yellowish root vegetable, while turnip is a smaller root vegetable and has a purple hue .

Rutabaga and turnip are two similar root vegetables in the Brassica genus. They have a slightly bitter taste. You can use them raw, roasted, baked, mashed, or added to soups or stews. The best way to distinguish turnips from beets is by their size and appearance, especially their color.

Key areas covered

1. What is Rutabaga - definition, characteristics 2. What is beet - definition, functions 3. What are the similarities between Rutabaga and beet - overview of the common characteristics 4. What is the difference between Rutabaga and beet - comparison of the main differences

key terms

Turnips, Swede, turnip Difference Between Rutabaga and Turnip - Comparative Summary

What is rutabaga

Rutabaga is a large, round root vegetable. It is also known as the Swede . It is a form of Brassica napus and a cross between a turnip and a wild cabbage. Rutabaga actually looks like a large turnip. But it has a yellowish and brownish color on the outside, and an orange-yellow color on the inside. Turnips only grow in cool climates.

Key difference - rutabaga vs. turnip

Like cabbage, turnips have a slightly bitter taste, but they are milder and sweeter when eaten raw. If you cook it it will get spicier. In large sizes, they remain tender. Rutabaga is high in vitamin C and fiber, and is a good low-carb diet. One cup of turnip usually contains 12 grams of carbohydrates .

What is turnip

Beet is a round root vegetable with a white pulp. Beets are white and purple on the outside and have white flesh on the inside. They're usually smaller than turnips. Your leafy vegetables are edible too.

They're best when they're small and delicate, usually about the size of a tennis ball. As they get bigger, they get woody. Turnips usually don't need to be peeled, but the bigger they get, the thicker their skin will be and you may need to peel the skin. These beets also have a stronger taste than young beets.

Difference between turnips and turnips

We usually serve beets cooked as raw. But beets, especially baby beets, can be eaten young, in salads, or with dips. Beets can be baked, roasted, boiled, or even added to stews and soups.

Similarities Between Turnips and Turnips

  • Both turnips and turnips are root vegetables of the Brassica genus.
  • They have a slightly bitter taste.
  • You can use them raw, roasted, baked, mashed, or added to soups or stews.

Difference between turnips and turnips

definition

Rutabaga is a large, yellowish round root vegetable and is considered a hybrid between a beet and a wild cabbage, while the beet is a round root vegetable with white flesh.

size

Rutabagas are generally larger than beets.

colour

In addition, turnip has a yellowish and brownish color on the outside and an orange-yellow color on the inside, while a turnip has a white and purple color on the outside and white flesh on the inside.

taste

Rutabaga has a slightly sweet taste than beet.

When cooked

When the beets are cooked they will stay white, but the turnips will turn yellowish / golden.

diploma

The main difference between turnips and turnips is their size and appearance. Rutabagas are generally larger than beets. In addition, turnip has a yellowish and brownish color on the outside and an orange-yellow color on the inside, while a turnip has a white and purple color on the outside and white flesh on the inside.

Reference:

1. Watson, Molly. “How to choose, store and cook beets.” Eating spruce, available here . 2. Williams, Corey. “What is a Rutabaga - and what should you do with it? . “My recipes, available here .

Image courtesy:

1. “Rutabaga, Sorte nadmorska” By Picasa user Seedambassadors - (CC BY-SA 3.0) via Commons Wikimedia 2. “Turnip 2622027” By thebittenword.com - (CC BY 2.0) via Commons Wikimedia

About the author: Hasa

Hasa holds a BA in English, French and Translation Studies. She is currently reading for a Masters in English. Her areas of interest include literature, language, linguistics and also food.