What is the difference between Flash Forward and Foreshadowing?

The main difference between flash-forward and foreshadoing is that in flash-forward the plot jumps into the future of the narrative, while in the premonition the author gives subtle hints and clues to the plot developments that come later in the story.

Both pre-flashes and premonitions are literary means that indicate what is going to happen in a story. However, Flash Forward leads the reader or viewer directly to a plot that will happen in the future, while the premonition contains subtle clues as to what will happen in the story.

Key areas covered

1. What is Flash Forward - definition, properties, examples 2. What is Foreshadoing - definition, properties, examples 3. What is the difference between Flash Forward and Foreshadowing - comparison of the most important differences

key terms

Lightning forward, premonition Difference Between Flash Forward and Foreshadoing - Comparative Summary

What is Flash Forward?

Flash forward, also known as prolepsis, is a literary device where the plot or plot jumps into the future of the narrative. What happens here is that a scene breaks the narrative and brings the narrative forward in time from the current time. In general, a flash forward represents an imagined or expected event in the future that is related to the main storyline. However, these events do not necessarily take place in the future. Flash forward is the opposite of flashback , which jumps back to past events. What is the difference between Flash Forward and Foreshadowing?

A famous example of a flash forward is Charles Dickens' A Christmas Carol, in which the protagonist Ebenezer Scrooge sees the future after his death. While not as common as flashback, writers use flash-forward to keep readers interested. Readers are particularly interested in the current events of the narrative to see how the plot moves towards the future already shown by the flash-forward.

What is premonition?

Premonition is a literary device in which the author gives subtle references to the events that will take place in the story. Authors often use indicative words and phrases as clues without spoiling the tension or revealing the story. However, they can be subtle, and readers will not be able to grasp them on their own first reading.

In general, foreboding is used by writers to prepare readers for a shocking turn in the story and to change the mood of the story. Mystery and suspense writers also use premonitions to strengthen the sense of mystery in their story.

The following phrases and clauses are some examples of foreboding from the literature.

“Go and ask for his name. - When he's married. My grave is like my wedding bed. "

- Romeo and Juliet, Shakespeare

As this dialogue suggests, Juliet's wedding bed turns out to be her grave as she falls in love with her family's enemy, Romeo, and dies with him.

Key difference - flash forward vs. premonition

Sophocles 'Oedipus Rex, Oedipus' words to Tiresius "You have lost your strength , stone-blind, stone-deaf - senses, stone-blind eyes!" Turns out to be an example of a premonition, since Oedipus loses all his power and in the end becomes blind and deaf.

Difference between Flash Forward and Foreshadoing

definition

Flash forward is a literary device where the plot or plot jumps into the future of the narrative. But premonition is a literary means by which the author gives subtle references to the events that will take place in the story.

future

While Flash Forward leads the reader or viewer directly to a plot that will happen in the future, the premonition contains subtle clues as to what will happen in the story.

Ability to recognize

It is possible to see the forward flash by yourself the first time you read it; However, it is not possible to discern techniques of foreboding the first time you read it.

diploma

In short, flash forward and foreshadoing are literary means of indicating what will happen in a story. The main difference between flash-forward and foreshadoing is that in flash-forward the plot jumps into the future of the narrative, while in the foreshadowing the author gives subtle hints and clues to the plot developments that come later in the story.

Reference:

1. "Flash-Forward - Examples and Definition of Flash-Forward." Literary Devices, January 12, 2018, available here .2, "Premonition". Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, September 5, 2019, available here .

Image courtesy:

1. "Tales from Shakspeare (1831) p289 Romeo and Juliet" By William Harvey - Internet Archive Identifier (Public Domain) via Commons Wikimedia 2. "Charles Dickens - A Christmas Story - Title Page - First Edition 1843" By John Leech - (Public Domain) via Commons Wikimedia

About the author: Hasa

Hasa holds a BA in English, French and Translation Studies. She is currently reading for a Masters in English. Her areas of interest include literature, language, linguistics and also food.