What is the difference between bromides and sulfites?

The main difference between bromides and sulfites is that bromides are boring, conservative, and predictable, while sulfites are different, interesting, and predictable .

Gelett Burgess is an American comedic writer who introduced the concept of bromides and sulfites. In his essay “Bromides and Sulphites” he divides people into two large groups based on their thoughts, attitudes and behavior. Sulphites and bromides are the names with which he introduced these two groups. Burgess also notes that there are hybrid characters in society - half bromides or half sulfites.

Key areas covered

1. Who are bromides - definition, characteristics, examples 2. Who are sulphites - definition, characteristics, examples 3. What is the difference between bromides and sulphites - comparison of the main differences

key terms

Burgess, bromides, sulfites Difference Between Bromides and Sulphites - Comparative Summary

Who are bromides?

Burgess described bromides as people whose thoughts and conversations are conventional and ordinary. In other words, bromides are conservative and boring people. Bromides are the larger group of the two and include common or average people who do everything routinely. They follow customs and traditions and follow a set life pattern. They obey the law of the average. In fact, all bromides think and act similarly.

According to Burgess, bromides have no individuality and follow the common path of the majority. Burgess also stated that bromides are not good leaders as they are always run by the majority. Bromides aren't very creative or innovative because they can't think of new ideas. They also have no aesthetic sense to appreciate beauty or art.

Difference Between Bromides and Sulphites

Burgess provided several examples of bromide characters. The character of Polonius in Shakespeare's play "Hamlet" and the character of Amelia Sedley in Thackeray's "Vanity Fair" are Bromides. Indeed, all of the average, predictable, and conservative characters in the literature are bromides. They are what we call flat characters . In addition, Burgess also described real people like Marie Corelli and President Roosevelt as Bromides.

Who are sulfites?

Sulphites are the complete opposite of bromides. Burgess described a sulfite as a person who represents this way of thinking. He also said that "one can never foresee what he will do except that it will be a direct and spontaneous manifestation of his own personality". Hence, sulphites do not speak or act like the majority; they do ordinary things in an extraordinary way or extraordinary things in an ordinary way. They have their own behavior patterns.

Sulphites are rare in society. Burgess uses Hamlet and Becky Sharp (in Thackeray's novel "Vanity Fair") as examples of sulfites. Such characters are adventurous and unpredictable. What we refer to as round signs in the literature are generally sulfites. Burgess also described Bernard Shaw, Lewis Carol, and President William McKinley as sulfites. In general, artists and reformers are sulfites.

Difference Between Bromides and Sulphites

definition

Bromides are people whose thoughts and conversations are conventional and ordinary, while sulfites are people who pursue their own thinking and lead interesting lives.

Counting

Most of the people in society are bromides as sulfites are rare.

predictability

While bromides are predictable, sulfites are very unpredictable.

nature

Bromides are dull and conventional, while sulfites are interesting and unconventional.

Change

Also, bromides don't like change, but sulfites bring change.

Examples in the literature

Polonius in Shakespeare's play "Hamlet" is a bromide, while Hamlet, the title character, is a sulfite. Also, in Thackeray's Vanity Fair, Amelia Sedley is a bromide, while Becky Sharp is a sulfite.

diploma

Bromides are dull and conventional, while sulfites are interesting and unconventional. While bromides are predictable, sulfites are very unpredictable. So this is the main difference between bromides and sulfites. Most of the people in society are bromides as sulfites are rare.

Reference:

1. Citizen, Gelett. "Are you a bromide?" ManyBooks , 2004, Available here .

Image courtesy:

1. “Blurbing” by Burgess, Gelett - (Public Domain) via Commons Wikimedia

About the author: Hasa

Hasa holds a BA in English, French and Translation Studies. She is currently reading for a Masters in English. Her areas of interest include literature, language, linguistics and also food.