What is the difference between angora and mohair?

The main difference between angora and mohair is that angora wool comes from angora rabbits, while mohair comes from angora goats .

Both angora and mohair are two luxurious fabrics or yarns . There is some confusion about these words, however, as most people make the mistake of confusing angora wool and angora goat. It is important to note that angora goats do not produce angora wool. The wool from angora goats is called mohair.

Key areas covered

1. What is Angora - Definition, Features 2. What is Mohair - Definition, Features 3. Similarities Between Angora and Mohair - Overview of Common Features 4. Difference Between Angora and Mohair - Comparison of Key Differences

key terms

Angora, mohair, wool

Difference Between Angora and Mohair - Comparative Summary

What is angora

Angora is a soft, fluffy wool that comes from angora rabbits. Angora fibers are very thin in diameter. There is also a halo-like effect on the fur around each strand, creating a shimmery look. This halo is actually an indication of the fluffiness of the wool. Like cashmere and alpaca , angora is a soft and luxurious product. It's also warm, light, and easy to felt. Besides, it's rigid; Because of this, it is sometimes mixed with stretchable fibers for elasticity. Angora is used for knitting clothes and weaving luxurious fabrics. The wool is obtained from captive rabbits.

Key difference - angora vs. mohair

It is also important to know that the name angora can also refer to angora goats. But when we use the name angora to speak of wool and yarn, it usually refers to the hair of angora rabbits. These rabbits molt three or four times a year and the wool is collected during this time. When the wool is harvested, the rabbits are plucked or sheared. In addition, Angora rabbits must be groomed at least once a week to avoid matting and matting. The American Rabbit Breeders Association recognizes four breeds of Angora rabbits: Satin, Giant, English, and French. There are other species besides these breeds. Each of these breeds produces hair with different textures and colors.

What is mohair

Mohair is the wool or yarn made from the hair of the angora goats. Like angora, cashmere and silk, it is a luxury fiber and usually very expensive. Mohair has a remarkable sheen and shine and is durable and resilient. It is also much softer than other sheep wool. It is also much more elastic than most types of wool and not very flammable. It's also compatible with most dyes. More importantly, mohair has exceptional insulating properties and is ideal for winter. Because of these numerous properties, some people call mohair diamond fiber.

Difference Between Angora and Mohair

You can find this yarn in sweaters, hats and other fluffy accessories. Sometimes mohair is mixed with other materials to improve properties such as durability and elasticity. Mohair is obtained from angora goats. Most of the world's mohair production comes from the USA and South America.

Similarities Between Angora and Mohair

  • Both are luxurious wool.
  • They are warm, light and durable.
  • They have a remarkable sheen and luster.

Difference Between Angora and Mohair

definition

Angora is a soft, fluffy wool that comes from angora rabbits, while mohair is the wool or yarn made from the hair of angora goats.

Wool vs. spring

Angora wool comes from angora rabbits, while mohair wool comes from angora goats.

Felting

In addition, angora wool mattes easily and quickly, while mohair is resistant to matting.

diploma

Angora wool comes from angora rabbits, while mohair wool comes from angora goats. So this is the main difference between angora and mohair.

Image courtesy:

1. "Fabric Guide: What is Angora Wool?" - 2021. “MasterClass, Nov. 8, 2020, available here . 2. "Fabric instructions: What is mohair? - 2021. “MasterClass, Nov. 8, 2020, available here .

Image courtesy:

1. “Valeria Di Roma Angora Red” By AnnaKika from Gothenburg, Sweden - Ull Mohair (CC BY 2.0) via Commons Wikimedia 2. “Ull Mohair” By AnnaKika from Gothenburg, Sweden - Ull Mohair (CC BY 2.0) via Commons Wikimedia

About the author: Hasa

Hasa holds a BA in English, French and Translation Studies. She is currently reading for a Masters in English. Her areas of interest include literature, language, linguistics and also food.