What is the difference between anarchy and tyranny?

The main difference between anarchy and tyranny is that anarchy refers to a state of lawlessness while tyranny refers to a state under cruel and repressive government.

Anarchy and tyranny are two conditions that involve the absence of laws or the unfair and unequal application of laws. Although both situations involve violence and oppression , there is a subtle distinction between anarchy and tyranny.

Key areas covered

1. What is anarchy - definition, characteristics 2. What is tyranny - definition, characteristics 3. Difference between anarchy and tyranny - comparison of the main differences

key terms

Anarchy, tyranny, tyrant Difference Between Anarchy and Tyranny - Comparative Summary

What is anarchy

Anarchy is a situation where a state has no government or the existing government has no authority over the people. The latter happens when the government is not officially recognized by the people. The term anarchy comes from the ancient Greek word anarchos , which means without authority; this denotes the absence of a sedentary government or rule of law. We usually associate anarchy with ideas such as violence, restlessness, chaos, lawlessness, and social breakdown. The current situation in Afghanistan under the Taliban can be described as anarchy.

In this day and age, anarchy can also refer to any community that is temporarily or permanently not under state control. For example, President Donald Trump declared areas of Portland, Oregon, and Seattle, Washington, a state of anarchy when Black Live protesters took control of the areas in the summer of 2020 and sent federal police officers to restore order.

Anarchy versus tyranny

According to the philosophy of anarchism , societies can only survive and thrive if they operate under alternatives to traditional government. Although most people currently view anarchy as a negative concept, the original concept of anarchy referred to a peaceful utopian society that combined the best facets of communism and classical liberalism . In addition, this society emphasizes individual freedom and equality.

What is tyranny

Tyranny refers to a state under a cruel and oppressive government. It can also refer to a state under the rule of a tyrant. A tyrant is an absolute ruler who is not restricted by the law. We also use the word tyrant to describe someone who has usurped the sovereignty of a legitimate ruler. Tyrants are often cruel and always try to secure their position by repressive or brutal means. Furthermore, in the views of Plato and Aristotle, a tyrant is an individual who rules without law and uses extreme and brutal methods against his own people and others. Furthermore, as these views show, tyranny includes 1) autocratic rule and 2) rulers have no legal restriction. In addition, we often refer to rulers like Henry VIII, Ivan IV, Joseph Stalin, and Adolf Hitler as tyrants.

The word tyranny comes from the Greek word tyrannos, which was used to describe a person who, unlike a monarch, had absolute and personal power within a state. For the ancient Greeks, however, tyrants were not necessarily bad or oppressive rulers.

Difference Between Anarchy and Tyranny

definition

Anarchy is a situation where a state has no government or the existing government has no authority over the people, while tyranny refers to a state under a cruel and oppressive government.

Ruler

In anarchy there is no officially recognized ruler, but in tyranny there is an official ruler.

persons

In anarchy, people can do what they want, while people have very little freedom.

diploma

The main difference between anarchy and tyranny is that anarchy is a situation where a state has no government or the existing government has no authority over the people, while tyranny refers to a state under a cruel and oppressive government.

Reference:

1. Longley, Robert. “ What is anarchy? Definition and examples . "Thought Co. 2. " Tyrant ". Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, August 14, 2021.

Image courtesy:

1. “ Skate and Troubles ” by Sergio Sebastian (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0) via Flickr

About the author: Hasa

Hasa holds a BA in English, French and Translation Studies. She is currently reading for a Masters in English. Her areas of interest include literature, language, linguistics and also food.