Difference between amphiprotic and amphoteric

Main difference - amphiprotic vs. amphoteric

Amphoterism is the presence of amphoteric properties. Amphoteric substances are compounds that, depending on the medium, can act as acids as well as bases . The term amphiprotic describes a substance that can both take up and release a proton or H + . All amphoteric substances are amphiprotic. But not all amphiprotic substances are amphoteric; some oxides are amphoteric but not amphiprotic because they cannot release or take up protons. The main difference between amphiprotic and amphoteric is that amphiprotic refers to the ability to donate or accept protons while amphoteric refers to the ability to act as an acid or a base.

Key areas covered

1. What is amphiprotic - definition, connections 2. What is amphoteric - definition, connections 3. What is the difference between amphiprotic and amphoteric - comparison of main differences

Key Terms: Acid, Amphiprotic, Amphoteric, Amphoterism, Base, Hydronium Ion, Hydroxide, Oxide, Proton

Difference Between Amphiprotic and Amphoteric - Comparative Summary

What is amphiprotic?

In chemistry, the term amphiprotic describes a substance that a proton or H + can both take up and release. An amphiprotic compound has both acidic and basic properties and can act as either an acid or a base, since an acid is a chemical species that can donate a proton, while a base is a compound that can donate a hydroxyl ion (-OH). to the medium. For example, amino acids are amphiprotic molecules. This is because amino acids are made up of amine groups (basic) and carboxyl groups (acidic).

Difference between amphiprotic and amphoteric

Figure 1: Amino acids consist of an –NH2 group and –COOH.

One of the most important amphiprotic compounds is water. When an acid donates a proton to water, water can absorb this proton and form hydronium ions (H 3 O + ). When a base reacts with a water molecule, the water molecule donates a proton. Amphiprotic nature refers to the ability to both donate and receive protons. The amphiprotic nature of water describes the ability of water to be amphiprotic.

What is amphoteric?

Amphoteric refers to the ability to act as both an acid and a base. The behavior of these connections depends on the medium. Water is a good example of an amphoteric substance. Water molecules can give up protons or take up protons and can act as an acid or base. The lone pair on the oxygen atom of the water molecule helps to pick up an incoming proton.

Amphoteric nature means having amphoteric properties. Most oxides and hydroxides are good examples of these substances. An amphoteric oxide is an oxide that can act as either an acid or a base in a reaction to produce salt and water. Amphoterism depends on the oxidation state of the atoms in the oxide or hydroxide. Since most metals have several oxidation states, they can form amphoteric oxides and hydroxides.

Main difference - amphiprotic vs. amphoteric

Figure 2: Zinc oxide is an amphoteric oxide

For example, zinc oxide is an amphoteric oxide. It can react with both acids and bases. When reacting with sulfuric acid, zinc oxide forms zinc sulfate and water as end products. When zinc oxide reacts with sodium hydroxide (aqueous), sodium zincate (Na 2 [Zn (OH) 4 ]) is formed. When hydroxides are taken into account, aluminum hydroxide and beryllium hydroxide are the most common amphoteric hydroxides.

Difference between amphiprotic and amphoteric

definition

Amphiprotic: The term amphiprotic describes a substance that a proton or H + can both take up and release .

Amphiprotic: The term amphoteric refers to the ability to act as both an acid and a base.

theory

Amphiprotic: Amphiprotic substances can both take up and release protons.

Amphiprotic: Amphoteric substances can act as both an acid and a base.

nature

Amphiprotic: All amphoteric substances are amphiprotic.

Amphiprotic: All amphiprotic substances are not amphoteric.

diploma

The main difference between amphiprotic and amphoteric is that amphiprotic means the ability to donate or accept protons, while amphoteric means the ability to act as an acid or a base. However, not all amphiprotic substances are amphoteric; some oxides are amphoteric but not amphiprotic because they cannot release or take up protons.

Reference:

1. Helmenstine, Anne Marie. "Amphiprotic Definition." ThoughtCo, March 8, 2014, available here . 2. "11.11: Amphiprotic Species." Chemistry LibreTexts, Libretexts, Sept. 6, 2017, available here . 3. Helmenstine, Anne Marie. "Amphoteric Definition and Examples." ThoughtCo, May. 4, 2017, available here.

Image courtesy:

1. "AminoAcidball" by GYassineMrabet - created with Inkscape. - Own work (Public Domain) via Commons Wikimedia 2. “Zinc Oxide Sample” By Adam Rędzikowski - Own work (CC BY-SA 4.0) via Commons Wikimedia

About the author: Madhusha

Madhusha is a BSc (Hons) graduate in Biological Sciences and is currently doing her Masters in Industrial and Environmental Chemistry. Her areas of interest for writing and research include biochemistry and environmental chemistry.